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Texas Public Information Act Settlement Agreement

It states: “A court of that State may not order a governmental authority or a public information officer to deprive of the public a class of public information described in subsection (a) or not to provide the class of public information for consultation or reproduction, unless the class of information is confidential under this chapter or another Act.” Q: Our hospital district recently laid off a high-paid employee. The employee has obtained a considerable agreement and the local government authority refuses to release the conditions. Aren`t local authorities prohibited from entering into confidentiality agreements? Section 552.103(a) of the Texas Public Information Act (TPIA), commonly known as the Litigation Exception, aims to prevent the use of public requests for information as a method to avoid investigative rules. Focus on paragraph 18, which states, “A settlement agreement involving a governmental authority.” Transaction agreements can be made, and apparently you can follow the public dollar. Finally, it is the taxpayers who end up footing the bill for the settlement agreements. As a concerned citizen, investigative journalist, or spy competitor, you file a TPIA application with a government agency to seek public information. And that`s it, however, the government agency refuses to provide the information and affirms a “trial exclusion” from the TPIA. But you didn`t su the government agency. What`s going on? Suppose, however, that the government agency`s lawyer simply refused a visit to the courthouse, filed an application for a confidentiality order, and the petition was accepted. . . .